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Course Descriptions 2017-2018

Courses primarily for:

Courses Primarily for First-Year and Sophomore Students

101-6-21 – First Year Seminar: How the 99% Live

No description available. 

101-6-21 – First Year Seminar: Making the Fittest: Issues in Evolution

No description available.

101-6-21 – First Year Seminar: Natives Beyond Nations

Indigenous peoples around the world are often imagined as "traditional" and "local" with customs "as old as time." But in reality Indigenous peoples engage with the globalizing processes of the 21st century just as the rest of their fellow humans do. This course surveys key issues in Indigenous peoples' lives as related to globalization, transnationalism, and diaspora. We will explore theoretical approaches from Native American and Indigenous Studies as well as ethnographic examples from Asia, Oceania, Europe, and throughout the Americas.

ANTH 101-6-22 – First Year Seminar: An Anthropology of Westeros: Theorizing a Game of Thrones

George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire (ASOIAF) deliberately poses questions, but also embeds assumptions about the nature of humanity. How do elites maintain power? How do cultures develop such vastly different technologies, worldviews, and expectation of gender and sexuality? Is violence inevitable in a world of conflicting interests and limited resources? Do ‘great players’ dictate the course of history or are our fates tied to the unassailable power of climatic forces? Anthropologists pursue these same questions as they strive to understand human diversity on earth. In this course students will examine ASOIAF from an anthropological perspective and learn to identify and evaluate theories of human nature that the saga poses. Discussion will center upon six major themes – ORIGINS, OTHERS, BODIES, VIOLENCE, MATERIAL/IMMATERIAL, ENVIRONMENT AND ECONOMY. “Power is a curious thing”, and inspired by the riddle Varys poses to Tyrion, we will question throughout: where does power reside? How do the stories we tell about ourselves hold the power to shape our destinies for good or ill?

101-6-22 – First Year Seminar: Anthropology of Time

No description available.

101-6-22 – First Year Seminar: Fantastic Archaeology: Science & Pseudoscience

No description available.

101-6-23 – First Year Seminar: Modern Plagues

No description available.

101-6-24 – First Year Seminar: Wrestling

No description available.

105 – Evolution and Social Behavior: The Basics

Introduction to anthropology; the biological evolution of humankind; the evolution of culture; and the comparative study of existing or historically recorded societies.

211-0-1 – Culture and Society

How do cultural anthropologists ask and answer questions about the vast diversity of human life and experience? This course introduces the history, methods, and concepts of cultural anthropology. Topics include the study of kinship, gender and sexuality, economic exchange, race and ethnicity, religious practice, music and art, and applied/medical anthropology. We explore a set of questions such as: How do humans organize their lives? How do social differences and hierarchies impact those lives? How do people relate to one another and create meaning about those relationships? How do cultures change and travel over time and space? What kinds of solutions can anthropology offer for human problems? We look at case studies from contemporary cultures worldwide, including our own.

211-0-61 – Discussion Section

Discussion

213-0-1 – Human Origins

The emergence of human species through the process of organic evolution, emphasizing genetics, the fossil record, comparison with our nearest living relatives.

213-0-61 – Discussion Section

Discussion

214-0-01 – Archaeology: Unearthing History

The evolution of culture from its earliest beginnings through the development of urbanism and the state. Principles of archaeological research.

214-0-61 – Discussion Section

Discussion

214-0-62 – Discussion Section

Discussion

214-0-63 – Discussion Section

Discussion.

214-0-64 – Discussion Section

Discussion.

214-0-66 – Discussion Section

Discussion.

215-0-1 – The Study of Culture Through Language

The scope of linguistic anthropology from the study of language as an end in itself to the investigation of cultures through the medium of human languages.

215-0-1 – Discussion Section

Discussion

221 – Social and Health Inequalities

Definitions of and trends in social (e.g., class, gender, and racial/ethnic) and health outcomes and inequalities; discussion of a bi-directional relationship between social and health inequalities, including institutional/structural, individual/family/psychosocial, and biological mechanisms.

232 – Myth and Symbolism

Introduction to different approaches to the interpretation of myth and symbolism, e.g., Freudian, functionalist and structuralist.

255-0-1 – Contemporary African Worlds

Use of key anthropological insights about value judgments and cultural relativism to examine the survival strategies and turbulent histories of contemporary African societies.

255-0-61 – Discussion Section

Discussion

255-0-62 – Discussion Section

Discussion

270-0-1 – Anthropology of Social Media

In barely a decade, social media has transformed the world around us, the way we learn, the way we communicate, and our relationships. The changes have inspired claims about the ways social media are changing our lives. Yet most of these claims are very general. Taking an anthropological view, this course looks at a variety of forms of social media in very different social contexts, concentrating on content of social media rather than platforms. We will also use social media as a research method for understanding people's lives as they converge in both online and offline spaces. We will see not only how social media has changed people's lives but also how these people have changed social media. Interestingly, this course challenges many of the claims that are made about what social media is by showing the incredible variation in social media that emerges on different continents, among people of different class and religious backgrounds, for people with different gender identities and sexual preferences, for producers, consumers, and students. As we will find, social media can tell us much about the contemporary world at large. 

Courses Primarily for Junior and Senior Students

308 – Global Health in Human History

This course explores paleopathology including records of pre- and proto-historic adaptations to human disease, health, and medicine. A biocultural perspective on patterns of disease will provide a link between past perspectives and current realities. Prerequisite: 200-level anthropology, global health or biology course or consent of instructor. Taught with GBL_HLTH 308.

309-0-1 – Human Osteology

Knowledge of human osteology forms the basis of physical and forensic anthropology, bioarchaeology, paleoanthropology and clinical anatomy. This course will provide an intensive introduction to the human skeleton; particularly the identification of complete and fragmentary skeletal remains.

316-0-20 – Forensic Anthropology

Forensic anthropology focuses traditional skeletal biology on problems of medicolegal significance, primarily in determining the personal identity and trauma analysis from human remains. Prerequisite: 200-level anthropology or biology course or consent of instructor.

324 – Archaeological Survey Methods

Archaeological surveys and their unique contributions to research about past peoples and places. This course will utilize geospatial technologies, such as shallow geophysics and GIS.

334-0-1 – Anthropology of HIV-AIDS

This course examines HIV/AIDS from an anthropological perspective, looking critically at the history of anthropology's involvement with the AIDS crisis from the disease's discovery to the present day. It offers a broad overview of the social, cultural, political and economic factors shaping the global HIV/AIDS epidemic, and of the policy responses that the epidemic has generated in different settings.

343 – Anthropology of Race

Anthropological approaches to the analysis of race, racialization, and anti-racism. Human variation, space, segregation, comparative analysis, and language ideologies.

370-0-61 – Discussion Section

Discussion

370-0-62 – Discussion Section

Discussion

381 – North African Prehistory

An Intensive field study of a cultural history of one or more areas of the continent, from archeological evidence.

395 – Field Study in Anthropology

Ethnographic field experience in the United States (e.g., the Southwest) or abroad. Offered in conjunction with summer field schools for exceptional students. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

396-7 – Junior Tutorial

Intensive work on a topic not normally offered.

398-0-1 – Senior Seminar

Supervised group discussion of research in preparation of senior capstone paper. Required of all majors.

399 – Independent Study

Open with consent of department to juniors and seniors who have completed, with distinction, at least two-quarter courses or equivalent in anthropology. Under the direction of individual members of the department.

Graduate-level Courses Available to Undergraduates

302 – Agriculture: Its Origins, Environmental Impacts, and Social Transformations

Beginnings of agriculture, one of the great revolutions in human history. Domestication of plants and animals, dispersal of domesticates, long-term intensification of agriculture, environmental consequences of agriculture, and related social and cultural transformations. Archaeological evidence from Mesopotamia, Europe, Mesoamerica, and North America.

Prerequisites: One of the following: 214, 225, Biological Science 204, or Environmental Sciences 235.

306-0-1 – Evolution of Life Histories

Evolved strategies for allocating resources among growth, reproduction, and maintenance; emphasis on the biological processes underlying the human life cycle and its evolution.

310 – Evolution and Culture

Introduction to the application of theory from evolutionary biology to cultural anthropology; principles of evolutionary biology; application of principles to human social behavior and culture. Prerequisite: 213 or equivalent.

311 – Indians of North America

Survey of indigenous cultures of northern Mexico, continental United States, Alaska, and Canada. Languages, art, and social, economic and religious life of representative Native North Americans.

312-0-1 – Human Population Biology

This course will provide an overview of current theory and research in human population biology. The course will focus on the influence of ecological and social factors on various aspects of human biology (e.g. metabolism, growth, nutritional status, disease patterns). The adaptation concept will first be presented, discussed, and critiqued. We will then examine how adaptation to different ecological stressors (e.g. temperature, solar radiation, high altitude, diet/nutrition) promotes human biological diversity.  Prerequisite: 213.

313 – Anthropological Population Genetics

Principles of population genetics applied to primates. Mathematical models, analyses of small populations and interaction of social and genetic processes. Prerequisite: consent of instructor.

314-0-1 – Human Growth and Development

In this course we will examine human growth and development. By its very nature this topic is a biocultural process that requires an integrated analysis of social construction and biological phenomena. To this end we will incorporate insight from evolutionary ecology, developmental biology and psychology, human biology and cultural anthropology. Development is not a simple matter of biological unfolding from birth through adolescence; rather, it is a process that is designed to be in sync with the surrounding environment within which the organism develops. Additionally we will apply these biocultural and socio-ecological insights to emerging health challenges associated with these developmental stages. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level course in anthropology, psychology, or biology or consent of instructor.

315-0-1 – Medical Anthropology

Theories of interactions between culture and biology that affect human health. Beliefs and practices for curing illness and maintaining well-being. The Cross-cultural study of infectious and chronic diseases, mental illness, infant/maternal mortality, poverty, and gender. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level anthropology or sociology course, or consent of instructor.

317 – Human Evolution

Fossil record and reconstruction of phylogeny, morphological and behavioral adaptation of early hominids and forebears.

318 – Material Worlds of the Middle Ages

The landscapes, buildings, and material culture of medieval Europe, as seen through archaeology and related disciplines. Villages, fields and peasant communities; castles, houses, and churches great and small; pottery, artifacts, dress and foodways.

319 – Material Life & Culture in Europe, 1500-1800AD

The landscapes, buildings, and material culture of early modern Europe, as seen through archaeology and related disciplines. Villages, fields and rural communities; towns; houses and churches great and small; pottery, artifacts, dress and foodways.

320 – Peoples of Africa

A survey of the cultures of Africa and the significant similarities and differences among the indigenous societies of the continent.

321 – Archaeological Field Methods

Practical training in archaeological field methods and techniques at an excavation site; given with Summer Archaeological Field School.

322-0-1 – Introduction to Archaeology Research Design and Methods

Quantitative and numerical approaches to the description and analysis of patterns in archaeological data, including typology, sequence ordering and attribute analysis. Prerequisite: 301 or 302 or equivalent.

325 – Archaeological Methods Laboratory

Analysis of archaeological methods (faunal, botanical, artifact, or soil analysis) with various techniques. May be repeated for credit.

327-0-1 – The Archaeology of Ethnicity in America

History of different ethnic groups in America as shown through living quarters, burials, food remains tools, jewelry, etc. How groups have been portrayed in museums claiming to depict the American past. Focus on African Americans and Native Americans.

328-0-1 – The Maya

The archaeology of the Maya in Latin America; life and society in pre-Columbian Maya civilization.

330-0-1 – Peoples of the World: Ethnography of N. Africa with MENA 390-3-20

While North Africa (the Maghrib) is often considered an appendage of the Muslim Middle East, this Mediterranean region merits study on its own, given its French colonial past and its connections to both sub-Saharan Africa and Europe. This course introduces students to the region through text and expressive culture (visual culture and music). Required readings will include one book or its equivalent in articles per week, drawing from anthropology, related social sciences and humanities, and historical fiction. In-depth study of Amazigh (‘Berber') and rural populations will complement the study of Arab and urban populations in Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, and Libya. Major themes include language and expression, orality and literacy, colonialism, nationalism, religion, migration, and gender.

332-0-20 – The Anthropology of Reproduction

Marriage and reproduction throughout the world, particularly the developing world and Africa. Conjugal strategies, fertility, contraception.

335 – Language in Asian America

A survey of linguistic anthropological topics that pertain to Asian American communities, including bilingualism, code-switching, language socialization, language shift, style, sociolinguistic variation, indexicality, media, and semiotics. Taught with Asian-Am 335.

339 – Material Culture

The relationship between material objects and social life; review of theoretical approaches to gifts and commodities; ethnographic collecting in colonial and postcolonial settings; the relationship between culture and aesthetics. Prerequisite: 211, or consent of instructor.

341 – Economic Anthropology

Economic organization in small-scale, non-industrialized communities. Traditional structures of primitive and peasant economies.

347 – Political Anthropology

A cross-cultural study of a political organization in stateless and state societies. The state, its origin, and changing role in developing countries.

350 – Anthropology of Religion

The human relationship with the supernatural and action patterns accompanying beliefs. Comparison of nonliterate religions and historical religions.

354 – Gender and Anthropology

Cross-cultural survey of women's roles from three perspectives: biosocial, sociocultural, politicoeconomic. Theory of gender inequality; emphasis on the third world.

355 – Sexualities

Cross-cultural survey of sexuality from an anthropological perspective. Focus on the first half of the 20th century, the 1970s, 1980s, and the turn of the century.

360 – Language and Culture

The relationship between language and culture: language as the vehicle of culture and as the manifestation of thought.

361-0-1 – Talks as Social Action

Combined advanced undergraduate and graduate course. Run as a weekly workshop on methodology and discourse analysis, this course tackles the collection, transcription, and analysis of verbal data. We explore the ways in which conversation, narrative, and other verbal expressive genres can help us better understand cultural processes. Interaction is central to the course, and we are particularly attentive to the power dynamics between interlocutors, situational constraints and conventions, and political economies that condition everyday talk. Each student will collect audio recorded data, transcribe it, and become familiar with data collected by course peers. We use the class corpus in discussion and in written analyses. Each week's readings explore a different analytic approach, and we link microsocial and macrosocial processes to investigate ways in which the seemingly mundane everyday particulars are both reflective of and constitutive of broader meaning. Prerequisite: 215 or consent of instructor.

362 – Advanced Methods in Quantitative of Analysis

A broad range of classical statistical methods, univariate and multivariate, currently being applied to anthropological data. Prerequisite: 200-level statistics course or consent of instructor.

363 – Language Variation and Change

Introduction to the study of language in its social context, with a focus on quantitative sociolinguistics and the frameworks and methods of analysis developed by sociolinguists at work in this area. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.

365 – Language, Race, and Ethnicity in the United States

Analysis of connections between language ideologies, language use, and meanings of race and ethnicity. Bilingualism, immigration, identity, accented English, African American English, language policy, "English only" movement, education, social change. Taught with ASIAN AM 365; students may not earn credit for both courses.

368 – Latino & Latina Ethnography

The sociocultural analysis of U.S. Latina/o communities. Examines ethnographies by and about Latina/os based in the United States. Draws on a broad disciplinary basis, to critique and elaborate on ethnographic methods and epistemologies. Prerequisite: 211, Latin AM 251, or consent of instructor.

369 – Contemporary Immigration to the United States

Major theories in immigration studies; contemporary processes of immigration and immigrant "community building" in the United States. Prerequisite: 1 200- level course in anthropology or sociology.

370-0-20 – Anthropology in Historical Perspective

Major schools of thought in social, archaeological and biological anthropology over the last century. Prerequisite: one 200-level course in anthropology or consent of instructor.

372 – Third World Urbanization

Urbanization processes in the Third world. Spatial development, wage labor, the informal sector, gender relations, rural-urban migration, and global and transnational interactions. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level social science course or consent of instructor.

373-0-1 – Power and Culture in American Cities

Overview of history and present realities of American urban life, with a focus on ethnographic knowledge and stratification by class, race, ethnicity, gender, nationality, and sexuality. Prerequisite: 100- or 200-level cultural anthropology or sociology course or consent of instructor.

374 – The Anthropology of Complex Organizations

Examination of recent research in organizational ethnography based on investigations in industrial ethnology, the anthropology of work, studies of public-sector bureaucracies, and research in multinational corporations. Prerequisite: 100 or 200 level anthropology or sociology course or consent of instructor.

376 – Socialization

The Cross-cultural study of the intergenerational transmission of culture; processes by which social groups pass on social tradition and behavior to succeeding generations. Prerequisite: 211, the introductory psychology course, or consent of instructor.

377 – Psychological Anthropology

Contemporary approaches to cross-cultural behavior: ecocultural aspects of behavior development through maturation and socialization in human and nonhuman primates. Prerequisite: introductory survey courses in psychology or anthropology, or consent of instructor.

378-0-1 – Law and Culture

Introduction to anthropology of law; institutional knowledge as seen in material culture and legal documents; colonial and post-colinial settings; examines the relationships between law and culture, colonialsim, evidence, globalization. Prerequisite: 200-level course in anthropology or consent of instructor.

382 – Households and Everyday Life

The role of households and everyday life in past and present societies throughout the world. Focus on people, gender, social relations, and interpersonal relations.

383 – Environmental Anthropology

Theory of interactions between organisms and their environments, with application to human populations.

384 – Slavery's Material Record

Archaeological approaches to studying Atlantic world slavery; botanical and material legacies of Africans in the Americas; archaeology of resistance.

386-0-20 – Methods in Human Biology Research

A laboratory-based introduction to international research in human biology and health; methods for assessing nutritional status, physical activity, growth, cardiovascular health, endocrine and immune function. Prerequisite: 362 or consent of instructor.

389-0-1 – Ethnographic Methods and Analysis

Descriptive, naturalistic study of the culture of human social groups. Data gathering through observation and interview. Data analysis for ethnographic reporting. Prerequisites: 211 or 215.

390-0-21 – American Inequialities, the Public Sphere, Counterpublics

How do we come to understand ourselves as Americans? How do some visions of American lives deny full citizenship to other Americans? What is the connection between that denial and both enduring domestic political, economic, and social inequalities, and the history and contemporary realities of US foreign policy? This seminar will focus on shifts in the US public sphere over the last half-century, and in particular on its variegated role in the present, and on a range of lively minority counterpublics. We will investigate neoliberal globalization and widening inequalities on American self-understandings of their lives within a world of nations; the roles of corporations and wealthy individuals in the construction of publicly recognized "common sense" understandings; the devastating effect on journalism of the rise of the online world; and recent upsurges of misogyny/homophobia, racism, and xenophobia. What is the history of "fake news"? How have individuals and groups attempted to counter it? Students will read widely on these topics, and engage in their own mini-research projects related to course concerns.

390-0-21 – Primate Behavior & Ecology

Advanced work in areas of developing interest and special significance. Can be repeated for credit with a different topic.

390-0-22 – Archaeology of Food and Drink

Food is a universal requirement for humans to survive, yet different cultures have developed radically divergent cuisines. In this course, we will use archaeology to explore the diversity of human foodways throughout time, and the role of food in human evolution and culture. You will learn about the origins of cooking over 1 million years ago, the `real' Paleodiet, how the Incas used beer at parties to build social alliances, and how Columbus's discovery of the Americas spurred global scale shifts in food and agriculture. The course begins with an overview of how anthropologists and archaeologists study food, and then moves through time, beginning with our early hominid ancestors and ending with colonialism.

390-0-23 – Porous Borders: Geography, Power and Tactics of Movement

Advanced work in areas of developing interest and special significance. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

390-0-23 – Shady Business: Informal Economies in Contemporary Capitalism

Advanced work in areas of developing interest and special significance. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

390-0-24 – Anthropology of NGO

Advanced work in areas of developing interest and special significance. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

390-0-24 – Methods in Anthro/Global Health

Advanced work in areas of developing interest and special significance. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

390-0-25 – Ecology of Infant Feeding

Advanced work in areas of developing interest and special significance. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

390-0-25 – Learning to Listen: An Introduction to Oral History

Advanced work in areas of developing interest and special significance. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

390-0-25 – Sex & Surveillance with GNDR_ST 353-0-20

Scopophilia is the derivation of pleasure from looking. What pleasures does the surveillance state gain from looking at us? From feeling and documenting us? How do privacy activists fight back against such surveillance, and what might be wrong with privacy rights discourse? Which groups are always already surveilled? In this class, students will play with notions of surveillance—including sousveillance, lateral surveillance, and counter surveillance—as engaged by queer and feminist studies, the cultural anthropology of expertise, and social studies of science and technology. We will draw on case studies ranging from police technologies, facial recognition software, PornHub’s data collection projects, TSA airport body scanners, Facebook ads, science fiction like Black Mirror, and more to understand how bodies, races, genders, and sexualities are made known and contested by activists, artists, corporations, and governments.

390-0-26 – Ancient Health and Migration: Shaping Patterns of Global Diversity Today combined with ANTHRO 490-0-24

Why are different modern populations more or less susceptible to certain diseases? Does the "Paleo Diet" actually mimic early human diets? Do differences in rates of lactose intolerance and sensitivity to bitter tastes reflect past diets? How have behaviors, such as cooking and domestication of livestock, influenced co-evolutionary relationships with parasites, such as tapeworms? What genetic material did we acquire through interbreeding with other species of Homo (Neanderthals and Denisovans)? In this course, we will examine how the paleogenomic revolution in biological anthropology is transforming both how we ask questions about early humans and what questions are possible to ask. We will begin the course with an overview of methodologies used to study ancient DNA, paleopathology, and paleoecology, with an emphasis on recent advances in paleogenomics. We will then examine new research where evidence from ancient DNA is supplementing or transforming theories about early human health, diet, and migration, and discuss how these new theories improve our understanding of how our population histories have influenced modern human health, adaptation, and diversity today.

390-0-26 – Children in Motion: The Social Dynamics of Children Living Away from Families of Origin

Advanced work in areas of developing interest and special significance. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

390-0-26 – Selfies, Social Movements, and Fake News: Media Anthropology Today

Advanced work in areas of developing interest and special significance. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

390-0-27 – Anthropology of China

Advanced work in areas of developing interest and special significance. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

390-0-27 – Native American Health with GBL_HLTH 390-0-21

We will devote the first half of the quarter to readings and discussions. During the second half, students will embark on individual mini-research projects arising from seminar concerns with the American public sphere and counterpublics. These projects should include an interviewing/ethnographic component. Students will present their findings in the last two seminar meetings, and turn in papers describing that research and those findings at the end of the quarter.

390-0-27 – Queer Robotics

Advanced work in areas of developing interest and special significance. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

390-0-28 – Ethnobiology of Maple Syrup

Advanced work in areas of developing interest and special significance. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

390-0-28 – Islam in Asia with ASIAN_ST 390-3-20 & RELIGION 359-0-20

This class introduces you to a wide variety of ethnographies on Muslim communities in Asia, both in the range of regions and states – Iran, Pakistan, India, Malaysia, Indonesia, and China – as well as in terms of themes – how Muslims engage secularizing states, coexist with hegemonic non-Muslim majorities, survive as refugees on the battleground of rival nation states, and, with native languages other than Arabic, make the Qur’an collectively meaningful. At the same time, you will sharpen your ability to read and evaluate difficult books.  We will analyze the ethnographies as texts to understand how the authors combined different kinds of texts to achieve the effect of a unified ethnographic whole, which different fieldwork activities yielded specific forms of data or empirical materials, which writing techniques authors used to give voice to different groups of informants, and how authors attempted to represent the hold of the past on the “now” of fieldwork.

 

390-0-28 – Language & Sexuality

Advanced work in areas of developing interest and special significance. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

390-0-29 – Dietary Decolonization with HUM 370-5-20 & AMER_ST 310-0-22

In response to the negative social effects of globalization and industrialization on the contemporary food system, there has developed increased attention to questions of sustainability, food justice, and food sovereignty. While such concepts are useful for thinking about liberatory food futures more generally, they often draw upon foundational Indigenous concepts without directly naming them as such. This course, then, focuses on new discourses about food sovereignty by highlighting (rather than obscuring) the linkages between decolonial or sovereign food futures and histories of erasure and dispossession of Native peoples. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, course readings draw from the fields of Food Studies, Indigenous Studies, and Pacific Island Studies in the form of academic articles, cookbooks, short film, and poetry. Throughout, we will question the potentialities of food sovereignty within the settler state, whether dietary decolonization is possible in the so-called age of the Anthropocene, and the limits of working within and against today’s legacies of the colonial food system.

390-0-29 – Pop Culture in Latin America

Advanced work in areas of developing interest and special significance. May be repeated for credit with different topic.

391 – Archaeology, Ethics and Contemporary Society

Why the study of the past is relevant to the present; examination of ethical issues in archaeology as they arise during the field work experience. Prerequisite: 321

393 – Chicago Field Studies Internship

396 – Advanced Archaeological Field Methods

Complex excavation and survey procedures, topographic map-making, excavation drawing, soil description. Offered in conjunction with the Summer Archaeological Field School.

Courses Primarily for Graduate Students

401-1,2,3 – Logic of Inquiry in Anthropology

Advanced introduction to the core of anthropology for beginning graduate students.

422-1,2 – Archaeological Thought in Historical Perspective

Advanced introduction to archaeological research as a process in which theoretical constructs shape research designs.

424 – Seminar in Biological Anthropology

Presentation and discussion of topics in biological anthropology, including graduate student and faculty research interests, new literature and reports on current meetings.

461 – Methods of Linguistic Anthropology

Methods and techniques of linguistic anthropology, such as componential semantic analysis, linguistic ethnography (ethnoscience), systematic lexicography and the use of informants and interpreters.

470 – History of Anthropological Theory

Sociocultural anthropology during the past 150 years; philosophical and historical roots of the subject.

472 – Seminar in Political Anthropology

Anthropological approaches to cross-cultural study of political and political organization. Themes include evolutionary and historical frameworks; political processes; kinship, ethnicity and religion; political change, colonialism and the world system.

473 – Seminar in Economic Anthropology

Anthropological approaches to the study of economic life. Case studies and theoretical works address the development of economic anthropology and its relationship to the rest of the discipline and to other social sciences.

474 – Seminar in Religion & Values

Philosophical and methodological problems that relate to cultural anthropology. Approaches to the analysis of cosmology, ritual and myth; comparison of scriptural and non-scriptural religions.

475-0-1 – Seminar in Contemporary Theory

Recent trends in social theory. Examines work from outside as well as within anthropology, as it has contributed to debate within the discipline (e.g., structuralism, practice theory, post-modernism).

484-0-1 – Seminar in Ling Anth: Law and Language

No description available.

485-0-1 – Seminar in Mind, Body and Health

This course will provide a graduate level introduction to the anthropology of mind, body, and health.  We will address broadly the question of how Anthropologists understand and investigate the social and cultural contexts of health and illness and the diverse ways in which humans use cultural resources to cope with pain, illness, suffering and healing. In addition, we will analyze medical practices as cultural systems, as well as the ways in which health, body, and mind are socially and politically constructed and manipulated, bodies are controlled and policed, and definitions of mind and mental processes influence and are influenced by social context.  There will be a particular focus on the concepts of embodiment and trauma and their various uses and meanings in specific contexts. We will combine an examination of current theoretical paradigms with ethnographic case material from a number of societies, including Brazil, Japan, the US, and Canada. The goal of this comparative endeavor will be to analyze similarities and differences across understandings of mind and body and systems of healing, and to examine American perspectives, behaviors, and practices critically in order to illuminate the ways in which they are socially embedded and culturally specific.

486 – Evolution and Biological Anthropology

History of evolutionary thought; the development of biological anthropology.

490-0-21 – Political Economy, Race, and Gender: Intellectual History and Contemporary Research with GNDR_ST 490-0-20

We now have had more than three decades of institutionalization and scholarly production in gender/sexuality and race/ethnic studies. We have also seen scholarship and activism largely part ways. Part of that process was the muting of attention to the class processes that always inherently suffuse gender, race, etc. stratification processes. And students are not often given the chance to trace the theoretical sources of our modern-day concerns. This seminar will help to fill in these elisions in two ways. First, we will be reading key texts by ten under-taught late-18th to mid-20th century Western theorists whose work on class, race, gender and/or nationality divisions has had a major impact on subsequent global thought. Then, we will be reading three excellent, relatively recent works by scholars that focus on race and/or class and/or gender stratifications globally, and the fights against them. Each seminar participant will then choose and report on her/his own fourth text in order to fill in missing geographic/topic areas, and to gain the opportunity to delve into work closest to their own research fields.

490-0-22 – Engendering Archaeology

What were the lives of women, men, and other genders like in the past? Why are researchers calling the emergence of feminist and gender archaeologies one of the most significant theoretical developments in our field? This course examines three decades of gender research in archaeology. How do we recognize gender archaeologically? What are the benefits, as well as limitations of an engendered approach to the past? What are the interdisciplinary implications of doing engendered research in archaeology?

490-0-22 – Integrative Seminar in Society, Biology, and Health

This course is required for the SBH cluster. Presentations by departmental faculty on contemporary topics of importance to the development of anthropology. May be repeated for credit with change in topic.

490-0-22 – Mapping People, Place, and Space

Presentations by departmental faculty on contemporary topics of importance to the development of anthropology. May be repeated for credit with change in topic.

490-0-23 – Biocultural Perspectives on Water Insecurity with GBL_HLTH 390-0-22

The first objective of this course is to introduce students to the many ways that water impacts our world. We will discuss what the international recommendations for safely managed water are and the health and social consequences of water insecurity. The second objective is explore why there is such variety in water insecurity worldwide. These discussions will be guided by the socio-ecological framework, in which dimensions ranging from the individual to the geopolitical are considered. Influences on access to water will be broadly considered; we will draw on literature in global health, ethnography, the life sciences, and public policy. The third objective is to develop critical thinking and writing abilities to reflect on the multi-dimensional causes and consequences of water insecurity.

490-0-23 – Ethnographic Methods

Presentations by departmental faculty on contemporary topics of importance to the development of anthropology. May be repeated for credit with change in topic.

490-0-23 – Migrant Sexualities and Queer Travelers: Translocations co-list with GNDR_ST 490-0- 22

Presentations by departmental faculty on contemporary topics of importance to the development of anthropology. May be repeated for credit with change in topic.

490-0-24 – Ancient Health and Migration: Shaping Patterns of Global Diversity Today combined with ANTHRO 390-0-26

Why are different modern populations more or less susceptible to certain diseases? Does the “Paleo Diet” actually mimic early human diets? Do differences in rates of lactose intolerance and sensitivity to bitter tastes reflect past diets? How have behaviors, such as cooking and domestication of livestock, influenced co-evolutionary relationships with parasites, such as tapeworms? What genetic material did we acquire through interbreeding with other species of Homo (Neanderthals and Denisovans)? In this course, we will examine how the paleogenomic revolution in biological anthropology is transforming both how we ask questions about early humans and what questions are possible to ask. We will begin the course with an overview of methodologies used to study ancient DNA, paleopathology, and paleoecology, with an emphasis on recent advances in paleogenomics. We will then examine new research where evidence from ancient DNA is supplementing or transforming theories about early human health, diet, and migration, and discuss how these new theories improve our understanding of how our population histories have influenced modern human health, adaptation, and diversity today.

496-0-1 – "The Field" - Bridging Seminar

Advanced course designed to integrate topics from the four sub fields of anthropology (archaeology, biological anthropology, cultural anthropology and linguistic anthropology). May be repeated for credit.

499-1,2,3 – Independent Study

Permission of instructor and department required.

510-1,2,3 – Faculty Colloquium

Faculty, visitors and advanced graduate students present lectures on the state-of-the-art in anthropology, based on their own research.

570 – Anthropology Seminar

Special topics. May be repeated for credit with change of topic.

590 – Research

Independent investigation of selected problems pertaining to thesis or dissertation.

595 – Field Study in Anthropology

Research experience in anthropological fieldwork to complement theoretical education and to prepare graduate students for advanced field research.

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