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2017 News

July

How babies’ environments lead to poor health later. Study shows how bodies “remember” experiences that increase risk for inflammation-related diseases

July 3, 2017 – from Northwestern Now
In addition to McDade, authors include Calen Ryan, Jess Meyer, Judith Borja, Gregory Miller and Christopher W. Kuzawa of Northwestern; Meaghan Jones, Julia L. MacIssac and Alexander M. Morin, University of British Columbia Child and Family Research Institute; and Michael S. Kobor, Child and Brain Development Program, Canadian Institute for Advanced Research and BC Children’s Hospital Research Institute and University of British Columbia.

May

Professor Mary Weismantel is named a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London

May 12, 2017 – from Society of Antiquaries of London
The Society consists of 3,000 elected Fellows who are distinguished in their fields of archaeology, architectural or art history, or other antiquarian subject matters across the academic, charitable, heritage and private sectors. Prof. Weismantel joins fellows Tim Earl, Matthew Johnson, Cynthia Robin and Mark Hauser.

Postdoctoral fellow Godfred Boateng received first place in the American Society for Nutrition’s Emerging Leaders Poster Competition

May 1, 2017
Awarded for his work entitled “Food Insecurity and HIV-exposure are Deleterious to Infant Cognitive Development in Kenya: a longitudinal study”.

April

Professor Shalini Shankar has been named a 2017 Guggenheim Fellow

April 21, 2017 – from John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation
During the Guggenheim Fellowship year, Shankar will be based in Brooklyn, NY. She will research Generation Z, exploring how this demographic category can be defined in ways that more centrally account for the contributions of immigrants and minorities.

Professor John Hudson receives Lifetime Achievement Award

April 17, 2017
John Hudson has received a Lifetime Achievement Award for Excellence in Rural and Agricultural Geography, from the Association of American Geographers.

Assistant Professor Amanda Logan article selected for 2017 Gordon R. Willey Prize

April 10, 2017
Amanda Logan’s article “Why Can’t People Feed Themselves?”: Archaeology as Alternative Archive of Food Security in Banda, Ghana,’ has been selected by the American Anthropological Association for the 2017 Gordon R. Willey Prize which "recognizes the best archaeology paper published in the American Anthropologist over a period of three years.”

Ryan Lash has Received the Franke Graduate Fellowship

April 5, 2017 – from Weinberg College of Arts & Sciences: Alice Kaplan Institute for the Humanities
For the full academic year, Franke Graduate Fellows will participate in Kaplan Humanities Institute activities, including weekly lunch colloquia, a dissertation working group, and the annual Future Directions Forum, where they will present their projects to Institute members.

Assistant Professor Adia Benton Awarded the 2017 Rachel Carson Prize

April 3, 2017 – from Society for Social Studies of Science
Adia Benton has been awarded the 2017 Rachel Carson Prize from the Society for Social Studies of Science for her book ‘HIV Exceptionalism: Development Through Disease in Sierra Leone’. This prize is awarded for a book length work of social or political relevance in the area of science and technology studies.

PROFESSOR MARY WEISMANTEL RECEIVES ACLS FELLOWSHIP

April 2, 2017 – from American Council of Learned Societies
Congratulations to Professor Mary Weismantel on receipt of a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies for work on "An Archaeology of Sex: The Moche Sex Pots"

Associate Professor Rebecca Seligman Awarded Research Grant from the William T. Grant Foundation

April 1, 2017
Rebecca Seligman has been awarded a research grant from the William T. Grant Foundation to study 'Cultures of Care: Exploring Inequalities in Mental Health Services Among Mexican-American Youth.'

February

Children as Caregivers: The Global Fight against Tuberculosis and HIV

February 17, 2017 – from Public Health Sciences
Congratulations to Jean Hunleth on the publication of her first book, Children as Caregivers: The Global Fight against Tuberculosis and HIV in Zambia (Rutgers University Press, Rutgers Series in Childhood Studies). Jean received her Ph.D. in Anthropology and M.P.H. from Northwestern in 2011. She is currently a Research Scientist in the Division of Public Health Sciences at Washington University in Saint Louis. In Children as Caregivers Jean examines the multiple ways that children act as caregivers to sick guardians in Lusaka, Zambia. Her book illustrates why it is so important to recognize and understand children’s care when developing global health policy.

January

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